A:
We see a continued increase in cyberattacks and
malicious content throughout all industries, and we will
continue to develop and implement measures to defend
against these threats.
—Holden
Again, my concern lies with cyberactivity. But outside of
that, I really don’t see any new threats. From time to time,
our association makes us aware of what might be happening.
Our biggest concern is someone infiltrating our network
systems. It would probably be a random act just to disrupt
our system.
—Coleman
I’d be on a ski hill in Chile all summer long if I could identify
the next security threat.
—Kelly
Q: Have you noticed an increase in the number of scam attempts
being perpetrated and what are your procedures for protecting your
business from being scammed?
A:
Yes, we have noticed an increase in the number of scam
attempts and have taken steps, such a installing a content
filter, to protect against such activities. In addition, we
are constantly communicating with our employees about
possible exposures to scams and alerts such as those from
the NRLA regarding recent scam activities, which are very
helpful in this endeavor.
—Holden
I can’t really say that I’ve seen an increase.
—Coleman
We haven’t seen any big scams, but we do have the
occasional customer who is purchasing on credit and
returning for cash, or various other low-level scams. We
usually identify those pretty quickly. Our staff does a good
job of pointing out fishy stuff. I’m thankful they’re fairly on
top of this. Also, I think our employees, certainly the long-
tenure ones, recognize theft reduces company profits, which
subsequently may affect the employee’s raise and bonus.
They take it personally when they think someone is stealing.
—Kelly
There are a lot more scams out there. We are all familiar
with the ones of large companies asking for quotes and
orders of large amount of material, and in some instances
taking delivery of the product and not paying the dealer.
Your sales team and A/R team need to be diligent on credit
applications, taking deposits, or asking for payment in full
with the random calls, and just being street smart. Good
basic business practices will keep you ahead of the game.
Nevertheless, you need to be aware of the small guy. I have
seen local homeowners and tradesmen try to take advantage
of the system. You just have to learn when to walk away.
—Price-Sims
Several years ago, the scams were obvious to most, but some
employees just did not have any exposure to this type of
threat; so at least one time items almost got shipped off.
Now everyone is much more aware of these types of threats,
and we are all hitting the delete button when these types of
inquiries come in over email.
—Miles
unsavory opportunity. We also limit check-signing privileges
to the company owners.
—Kelly
It is going to come from Internet attacks and “scams.” We
constantly need to be aware of what is going on in the world
and also take advantage of third-party systems that remove
the liability from us.
—Price-Sims
A steady flow of bogus inquiries for materials and tools as
mentioned above. The inquiry will ask for X to be shipped to
a destination and they offer to pay for it with a credit card,
which we are quite certain isn’t good.
—Miles
Q: Do you see any new security threats on the horizon?
43
SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2014
LUMBER CO-OPERATOR
(continued on pg. 116)
1...,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46 48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,...124